Breakdown: How Much Does a Live Music Video Cost?

I’ve been studying Alex Chaloff’s music videos recently, as they’re incredible examples of live music captures. It’s a testament to his work that even though I’m taking notes on camera angles, lighting, and sound all the way through, I can’t help but get lost in the performances.

Part of breaking down these videos is figuring out how much it might cost to put together a production like this. That’s helpful for me as it puts my rates into context; it’s also helpful for my clients to understand what goes into creating a video at this level.

There’s two parts to the cost of a production; kit fees and labor costs. Kit fees cover the equipment, and labor covers the efforts of everyone involved. $600 is a standard day rate for studios & camera ops here in CO, so I’ll use that for my estimates. As for the kit, a standard rate is 1% of its value per day. Let’s start with a minimal shoot like this one:

Continue reading “Breakdown: How Much Does a Live Music Video Cost?”

Gear Talk: Quality Over Quantity

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I’m a firm believer in using a small set of tools that you know inside & out, and this applies very strongly to my audio workflow. Rather than downloading massive plugin bundles, I’d highly recommend learning to work with just one DAW, one EQ, one compressor, and one reverb until you’re intimately familiar with the principles of each. 90% of my work is done with 4 very powerful pieces of software that I’ve listed below, and I’d highly recommend them to anyone who’s doing audio work at any level.

DAW // REAPER ($60)

Your DAW is your workflow, and workflow is the most important part of the mix process. I’ve been using REAPER for years, and I wholeheartedly recommend it for everything from editing podcasts & recording live shows to mixing & mastering studio albums. REAPER isn’t just cheaper than Pro Tools & Logic; in my opinion, it’s better. There are so many things I love about this DAW; free updates for life, incredible stability, fast & intuitive clip editing tools, flexible audio routing, great hardware integration, and perfect audio quality. I was able to use it competently after a few days of experimentation, but 2 years later I bought a hard copy of the manual and realized how many incredible features I hadn’t even discovered. Continue reading “Gear Talk: Quality Over Quantity”

Gear Talk: Buying Used Software

It took me a while to realize this, but you can buy audio software secondhand. Used software is the same as new software, but with a little patience you can buy your plugins for far less than their sticker price (usually about 50% off). Here’s a list of places where you can buy licenses; all of these are reputable communities with checks & balances to make sure you’re not paying for pirated software.

I’ve been buying from these forums for years now and I’ve only had good experiences; that said, make sure you pay through a service that allows disputes in case anything falls through.

Mixing Live Music: Hippocratic Filters with Bessel Curves

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Around a year ago I came across an enlightening post by Bob Macc on the consequences of treating your tracks with aggressive filters. You should go check it out yourself, but the big idea is that using steep filters causes phase distortion that reaches all the way up and down the frequency spectrum. Phase distortion removes clarity and impact from your mix, so it’s not good. With that in mind, I’ve come up with some points of good practice for filtering your audio.

First, use gentle filter slopes. 6db/octave is my go-to for LPFs, and 12db/octave is my go-to for HPFs. This lessens the impact of phase distortion, but most importantly, it sounds more natural and there’s less risk of accidentally cutting out the good stuff.

Second, use a Bessel curve. Bessel filters are linear phase, which means there’s near-zero phase distortion when they’re implemented correctly. While some EQs have linear phase DSP options, remember that if you’re using steep filter slopes, linear phase will cause distortion too; it’s the combination of gentle slopes and Bessel curves that’ll preserve your audio.

This advice is in line with the Hippocratic philosophy of mixing, e.g. “do no harm.” I’m mixing mostly acoustic music, hut it doesn’t matter if you’re mixing orchestral, folk, punk, or EDM; phase distortion from filters is rarely something you want. Following the two points above will save you a lot of mix clarity and let you put the distortion where you want it.